Monday, September 23, 2019

Shiny New Macook Air

My customer just purchased a new Macbook Air for me and over the weekend I managed to get my entire development environment working on it and feeling pretty good about it. But I have to say that I still like my current ChromeOS desktop and laptop with Intel Nuc for testing. The current problem with the mac experience is that it requires so much crap and 3rd party junk that [a] puts your dev machine at risk, customer machines at risk [b] and frankly puts your product at risk as there are so many dependencies that you cannot possibly know it all.

That same customer has been talking about moving some projects to rust-lang. I tried rust when it wa initially released and when I was a firefox fanboy. I don't remember exactly which browser failures caused me to abandon firefox entirely but they have come a long way since. One of the rust killer features is the output to web assembly. That's kinda interesting but so what? I build reports and business apps. I do not need 60fps video games or VR. I'd argue I need a simpler javascript.  BTW just looking at some sample code for hello-world and I know it's not for me. (but it does depend on who is paying the bills)

In that same period of time golang has come some way too. The best part is that I have not noticed it. The authors have managed to keep "the stupid" to a minimum even though the java paper dragons are trying to poison the waters. Frankly there is no place for object oriented code in microservices or system programming. But as much as I like golang it also need a light scripting language. I have tried to use otto, a javascript engine, and it works ok but javascript is just bad form. My bias is tcl and Lua. They work well and I can make that work easy enough.

So what do I think the future should be.... We would see a lot more innovation from the trenches if there was a new turbo pascal with some embedded scripting based on some simple language syntax so that it was possible to understand it all. And maybe extend it.

Productivity is money in the bank.

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