Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Vargo vs Toaks "meths" Stove

I recently purchased a Vargo alcohol stove and windscreen because there were a few features/functions that resonated with me. But before I get too far ahead let's look at the head to head.

Both of these syphon stoves need to get up to temperature before the alcohol gasifies and squirts out the jets. The Toaks does not really have a minimum fuel requirement... put as little or as much as you like. The Vargo is a variation of the penny stove and requires that the stove be filled to capacity. You can always extinguish and pour off the excess.

Both stoves can be inverted and use gel or solid fuel in addition to the alcohol. I filled both stoves with the same amount of fuel and lit them. The flame was clear and difficult to see in this environment. Once it gasifies it should be a blue flame.



Due to it's wider opening the Toaks sported an orange flame in addition to the jets (in blue).


The Toaks gasified in the first few minutes and the Vargo took 60-90 seconds. The Toaks exhausted it's 2oz of fuel in 10 minutes and the Vargo continued.


I tried to boil some water with the remaining fuel on the Vargo and while I managed to get hot water for an instant coffee or tea... maybe a ramen dinner it never got to a rolling boil as the Vargo ran out of fuel at about 18-19 minutes... Since I had the windscreen around it I could not determine when the flame went out.


The kits are quite different. Where the Vargo is just the three items (750ml pot, windscreen, stove) the Toaks has a bit more and frankly packing the Toaks is a pain.


In conclusion I think the Vargo is the better stove and there are many reasons why. First of all the fuel efficiency. Fewer parts. One thing I did not mention was that the Vargo is meant to have it's legs pressed into the ground for a lower center of gravity and overall stability. While the Toaks can be secured with stakes it's even more things to bring. The "20" minute burn time means that I could boil a greater volume of water without having to re-fuel.

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